Saturday, June 25, 2011

Slow Paint

Finally, the trim in the mudroom and porch has been painted. Yay! Also the sliding doors between porch and mud rooom and the door between mud room and bath room have two layers of much needed paint. It's all white. Between a full time job, three kids and great gardening weather, it has taken some time. I've promised myself to only paint in day light because it is so much easier to see any mistakes with proper light.

Finished the paint job.                                   Ready for wallpapering

White, #50003. linseed oil paint
by Allb├Ąck and a good brush.
I used Swedish linseed oil paint. In fact, the flax, whose seeds have been pressed to make the oil grew less than 50 miles from where I grew up in Southern Sweden. It's available in the US from solventfreepaint.com.
In our previous house, we used linseed oil paint for ALL interior woodwork. For the ceiling, beaded pine board, we mixed our own white stain from linseed oil paint, linseed oil and a little bit of turpentine.
The paint is very relaxing to work with, especially when painting entire doors. It takes 24 hours for it to dry, so there is plenty of time to even out any paint blobs or irregularities.
A good paint brush is a must, you can order that with the paint. Contrary to "normal" paint, this goes on in thin, thin layers and the brush strokes shows a bit more. My doors and trim came pre-primed, which was nice.

The new fiberglass back door is going to be blue. For a long time I was waiting for stable dry weather and now it's too hot. Oh well, it has to be done soon.

I hope to have the mud room finished by our Independence day backyard cookout. Imagine how convenient it would be for guests to use the powder room right there by the back door!

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Mudroom planning

The mudroom is still not finished so meanwhile I can show the drawings I made before the building process started. I used powerpoint and pasted screen shots and pics of doors, cabinets etc.

The mudroom was dimensioned after the cabinets. If you are going to build new walls any way, this is the cheapest way to achieve a custom built look. We did the same for the kitchen, laundry room and library in our old house. The windows and doors in the library were all placed after the IKEA Billy book shelves. The kitchen and laundry room was dimensioned after standard kitchen cabinets. After all, it is the same cost for a door no matter where you place it.



The Elfa system comes from the Container Store and I used their web tool for planning and then did screen shots that I cut and assembled with gimp before pasting them into powerpoint. (Do I dare to say that the super convenient Elfa system comes from Sweden? I grew up with it in the 60's and 70's and some of the old pieces are still in use in our house.) I took the drawings along when ordering the parts at the Container Store and it went very smoothly.

During the building process I taped these drawings to the walls to show builders, plumbers and electricians where to put what. I can easily imagine a room from a house plan, but to communicate a complicated (and not-so-common) layout, these sketches were good complements.